Northeast Atlanta Gaming

October 11, 2010

Merkavas and More

I’ve been  thinking along the lines of a set of Israeli armor that could span most of the period that Israel has been fighting and for now this is it. It includes tanks misrepresented in the AIW stock set and tanks whose combat ratings should be changed, based on a modern understanding of their armor and firepower. The Merkava is the tank in most need of change, as it was seriously underrated by Avalon Hill.

Also included are 90mm M48s and 20 pounder Centurions, as these played a major role in the Six Day War. Very few of the weapons  had been converted by then. It was in 1973 that essentially all M48s had 105mm guns and the Centurions had been converted to the Sho’t. The weapons presented date from prior to 1956, but do not really include the tanks of 1948. So, yes, incomplete, but spanning more tanks and types than any post before, are the tanks of Israel.

Merkavas_and_More

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August 6, 2010

A modified Weapons Effectiveness Chart

Since modern 120mm and 125mm cannon are often engaging in combat at 2300 to 2800 meters (1), and since these weapon’s power is often quoted at 2 kilometer range, it makes sense to me to modify the Arab Israeli Wars WEC or the Panzerleader ’70 chart to accommodate the extended range of these guns. I also like Byron Henderson’s amended WEC for PB/PL, which makes it difficult for WW II era tanks to shoot at ranges beyond 1500 meters. Those ideas just make sense to me. In the amended PL70 WEC presented below, the column A > 115 is intended for modern weapons of 120mm or more. Neither IS-3s nor T-62s would qualify, as they lack the modern FCS needed to fire efficiently at those ranges. Annex II of David Eshel’s book “Chariots of the Desert” speaks of T-62 performance, and the effective range of the weapon is presented there as about 1500 meters.

wechart-modded

References

1. Bohannen, Richard M. “Dragon’s Roar: 1-37 Armor in the Battle of ’73 Easting”, Armor, May-June 1992, p. 14
2. Eshel, David, “Chariots of the Desert”, Brassey, 1989, pp 190-192.

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